littleghostwriter

littleghostwriter:

BREAKING NEWS: Scotland Votes For Staying In The Union - Scots Decide ‘Better Off Together’!

The question Scottish voters had to answer was simple: "Should Scotland be an independent country?" Tensions were quite high. There was much at stake. 97% of the Scottish electorate registered to vote.

Here are the final results:

YES - 44,70%

NO - 55,30%

Scotland has voted for rejecting independence and staying within the United Kingdom.

ryanpanos

ryanpanos:

Scotland’s Big Decision | Via

Tomorrow, legal residents of Scotland, ages 16 and older, will be voting in a referendum to decide their country’s independence from the United Kingdom. While ending a centuries-old union is a complex and emotional issue, the wording on the ballot could not be more simple — “Should Scotland be an independent country?” — with only two choices, yes or no. Interest in tomorrow’s vote is extremely high, and more than 97 percent of Scotland’s eligible voters are registered to vote. “No” voters had the edge in polls for most of the past year, but “Yes” voters surged ahead to take a brief lead just weeks ago. At the moment, polls favor a “No” vote, but the slim margin makes the outcome too close to call. As Scotland prepares to decide its future, here is a collection of images of the campaign, the voters, and the country.

historia-polski

historia-polski:

Moszna Castle, Poland

"The Moszna Castle is a historic castle and residence located in a small village of Moszna in Poland. The castle is one of the best known monuments in the western part of Upper Silesia. The history of this building begins in the 17th century, although much older cellars were found in the gardens during excavations carried out at the beginning of the 20th century. Some of the investigators, including H. Barthel, claimed that those cellars could have been remnants of a presumed Templar castle, but their theory has never been proved. After World War II, further excavations discovered a medieval palisade.

The central part of the castle is an old baroque palace which was partially destroyed by fire on the night of April 2, 1896 and was reconstructed in the same year in its original form by Franz Hubert von Tiele-Winckler (the son of Hubert von Tiele-Winckler). The reconstruction works involved an extension of the residence. The eastern Neogothic-styled wing of the building was built by 1900, along with an adjacent orangery. In 1912-1914, the western wing was built in the Neo-Renaissance style. The architectural form of the castle contains a wide variety of styles, thus it can be generally defined as eclectic. The height of the building, as well as its numerous turrets and spires, give the impression of verticalism.  The whole castle has exactly ninety-nine turrets. Inside, it contains 365 rooms with a total floorage of 7,000 sq. m. and a cubic capacity of about 65,000 m The castle was twice visited by the German Emperor Wilhelm II. His participation in hunting during his stay at the castle was documented in a hand-written chronicle in 1911 as well as in the following year. The castle in Moszna was the residence of a Silesian family Tiele-Winckler who were industrial magnates, from 1866 until the spring of 1945 when they were forced to move to Germany and the castle was occupied by the Red Army. The period of the Soviet control caused significant damage to the castle’s internal fittings in comparison to the minor damage caused by WWII.

After World War II the castle did not have a permanent owner and was the home of various institutions until 1972 when it became a convalescent home. It is now a Public Health Care Centre for Therapies of Neuroses. It can still be seen or visited by tourists. The castle also has a chapel which is used as a concert hall. Since 1998 the castle housed a gallery in which works of various artists are presented at regular exhibitions.

Apart from the castle itself, the entire complex includes a park which has no precise boundaries and includes nearby fields, meadows and a forest. Only the main axis of the park can be characterised as geometrical. Starting from the gate, it leads along the oak and then horse-chestnut avenues, towards the castle. Further on, the park passes into an avenue of lime trees with symmetrical canals running along both sides of the path, lined with a few varieties of rhododendrons. The axis of the park terminates at the base of a former monument of Hubert von Tiele-Winckler. On the eastern side of the avenue there is a pond with an islet referred to by the owners as Easter Island. The islet is planted with needle-leaved shrubs and can be reached by a Chinese-styled bridge. The garden, as part of the whole park complex was restored slightly earlier than the castle itself. Preserved documents of 1868 state that the improvement in the garden’s aesthetic quality was undertaken by Hubert von Tiele-Winckler.”  (source)

Images: [x][x][x][x]

…one can either feel exclusively rooted to one specific identity (a city, a region, a country, etc.), or accept that identities can be cumulative and complimentary. The European project is obviously built on the second interpretation: “my Region, my Country, and Europe” constitute the wholly trinity of identity in our old continent. Any political discourse which calls for the exclusivity of one of these three pillars (including those who call for an “exclusively European” identity which obliterates regions and countries) are fundamentally wrong and verge on the side of totalitarianism – as they seek to impose a unique and exclusive identity upon inherently diverse people…

willkommen-in-germany
willkommen-in-germany:

Die Altstadt (old town) in Bremen, Northern Germany. Bremen was a member of the medieval Hanseatic League and is still one of the most important cities in Northern Germany. Together with the city of Bremerhaven on the Nordsee (North Sea) it forms Germany’s smallest state. Bremen has more than 1200 years of history, and was, for most of its existence, an independent city-state. The downtown area can easily be explored on foot. Schnoor as pictured above is an area of twisting lanes, a nice place to wander around and look at medieval architecture, cafes, and small shops. The world-wide known Beck’s Beer is brewed in Bremen.

willkommen-in-germany:

Die Altstadt (old town) in Bremen, Northern Germany. Bremen was a member of the medieval Hanseatic League and is still one of the most important cities in Northern Germany. Together with the city of Bremerhaven on the Nordsee (North Sea) it forms Germany’s smallest state. Bremen has more than 1200 years of history, and was, for most of its existence, an independent city-state. The downtown area can easily be explored on foot. Schnoor as pictured above is an area of twisting lanes, a nice place to wander around and look at medieval architecture, cafes, and small shops. The world-wide known Beck’s Beer is brewed in Bremen.

jamesbartholomeusz

Tusk and Morgherini: Appointments and Opportunities

jamesbartholomeusz:

Written with Daniel Schade for the Project for Democratic Union

Recent weeks have seen the appointment of two figures to positions at the apex of European government: the President of the European Council; and the High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy, the primary position of the EU’s Common Foreign and Security Policy (CFSP). Many Europeans will be asking two questions. Who are these appointees? And how will they impact on the short- and medium-term future of the European project?

Europe’s heads of state and government should be congratulated on their recent choice to fill the seat of Europe’s Council President with the current Polish prime minister, Donald Tusk. Awarding this post to an eastern European acknowledges the importance of these countries for the future of the continent, and marks the normality of their membership in the EU exactly ten years after the ‘big bang’ enlargement. Indeed, that Tusk is Polish is of particular significance, as he represents the leading member-state of the 2004 accession cohort.

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